Original Study

Open Access

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Peer-reviewed

To Study the Fear of Negative Evaluation and Sense of Alienation among Spiritual Well-Being in Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals, Pansexuals, and Asexuals

Ishaan Vats , Dr. Anu Teotia

DIP: 18.02.012/20240902

DOI: 10.25215/2455/0902012

Received: April 18, 2024; Revision Received: May 12, 2024; Accepted: May 16, 2024

Abstract

Background- Homosexuality is additionally referenced a few times in the Kamasutra that was recently referenced. The different kinds of disciplines that people faulted for homosexuality would get in an article that was disseminated in the paper India Today: women would have their hair shaved, women would have two fingers trimmed off, and men would risk losing their cast. The famous section 377 of the Indian Reformatory Code, enacted in 1861, specifically forbade sexual acts “against the request of nature.” These acts clearly included homosexuality, but they also included intercourse with minors or non-consensual sexual acts. They face a fear of negative evaluation or getting judged in society, a constant fear of cancelation, getting boycotted, or a sense of alienation fears them every moment. Here, a spiritual leader or insight can help in finding a ray of hope and coming out confidently. Objective- To study the relationship between the sense of alienation, fear of negative evaluation, and spiritual well-being amongst LGBTQIA2S+. Methodology- The data came from a sample of eighty- five (N=84) participants from the LGBTQIA2S+ community out of which 20 were gay, 16 were lesbian, 14 were pansexual, 24 were bisexual, and 10 were asexual. The sample was later found to consist of 31 Hindus, 14 Muslims, 11 Christians and 28 Atheists. The sample was collected from Queer Kinara, an LGBTQIA2S+ community page from Goa. Bivariate Pearson Correlation and one-way ANOVA were run to analyze the findings. Results- It is observed that lesbians and bisexuals reported the highest level of fear of negative evaluation, gays showed the highest level of sense of alienation, and pansexuals had the highest level of spiritual well-being in comparison to other individuals. It is observed that Muslims reported the highest level of fear of negative evaluation, Hindus showed the highest level of sense of alienation, and Hindus had the highest level of spiritual well-being in comparison to other individuals. Conclusion- There is a significant difference in the sense of alienation and subjective well-being among LGBTQIA2S+ whereas there is no significant difference in the fear of negative evaluation among LGBTQIA2S+. Similarly, there is a significant difference in the sense of alienation among Hindus, Muslims, Christians, and Atheists groups. There is no significant difference in fear of negative evaluation and subjective well-being among Hindus, Muslims, Christians, and Atheists groups.

The author(s) appreciates all those who participated in the study and helped to facilitate the research process.

The author(s) declared no conflict of interest.

This is an Open Access Research distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any Medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Responding Author Information

Ishaan Vats @ info.ijcst@gmail.com

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To Study the Fear of Negative Evaluation and Sense of Alienation among Spiritual Well-Being in Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals, Pansexuals, and Asexuals

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Article Overview

ISSN 2348-5396

ISSN 2349-3429

DIP: 18.02.012/20240902

DOI: 10.25215/2455/0902012

Published in

Volume 09 Issue 2, April – June, 2024

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